Should it be “Passover” or “Easter”?

Should Christians celebrate the Old Testament Passover, or the modern “Seder”?  Are we to go backwards to Old Testament animal sacrifices, or are we to look to the Lamb’s sacrifice (Jesus Christ on the Cross), and forward to His coming again?  What about the book of Hebrews? Does it allow for Christians to return to an OT passover??


Click on the link below to understand WHY “Easter” is correct in Acts 12:4, and using “Passover” in a post-resurrection context is incorrect!  (Once again, the modern translators got it wrong!)

http://www.kjvtoday.com/home/easter-or-passover-in-acts-124

“And when he had apprehended him, he put him in prison, and delivered him to four quaternions of soldiers to keep him; intending after Easter to bring him forth to the people.” ~ Acts 12:4

“Purge out therefore the old leaven, that ye may be a new lump, as ye are unleavened. For even Christ our passover is sacrificed for us.” ~ 1Corinthians 5:7

“Christ our passover” = Easter!

“Passover” vs. “Easter” Chart

{Click on the image above to enlarge in a new window}

“Whether “Πάσχα” should be Passover or Easter at Acts 12:4 must be determined by discerning who is using the word in this instance.  If the word is used by a Jew, then the word would mean Passover.  If the word is used by Herod, then the word would mean Passover or perhaps a pagan festival (although the possibility of “Πάσχα” referring to a pagan festival has no basis in history or etymology).  Contrary to what many believe, it is neither the Jews nor Herod who is using the word “Πάσχα” at Acts 12:4.  It is actually Luke, the Christian narrator of Acts, who is using the word “Πάσχα” to describe the timeline of events for his Christian readers in the latter first century, many of whom were Gentile Christians.  At the time of Luke’s writing, “Πάσχα” at Acts 12:4 was no longer the Passover but Easter.  When Luke speaks in Acts 12:4 as narrator, he is using words according to the mutual Christian perspective of himself and his readers.  This is evident because he uses the word “church” (εκκλησία) at Acts 12:1 to refer to Christians.  This is a dignifying Christian word to refer to the congregation of those who are called out by God.  Neither Herod nor the Jews would have referred to these rebels as “the called-out ones”.  However, when coming from a Christian narrator for a Christian audience, the word “εκκλησία” carries a Christian meaning.  The same goes for the word “πασχα”.  It may well be that Herod and the Jews had no concern or knowledge about Easter.  Although Herod and the Jews were waiting for the Jewish Passover, Luke uses “πασχα” according to its Christian meaning of “Easter” to explain the timeline of events to his Christian readers.  That is why “πασχα” is Easter in Acts 12:4.”  ~ http://www.kjvtoday.com/home/easter-or-passover-in-acts-124


 

Jesus clearly transitioned the Old Testament “passover” supper into the “communion” supper of the New Testament!

“And he said unto them, With desire I have desired to eat this passover with you before I suffer: 16 For I say unto you, I will not any more eat thereof, until it be fulfilled in the kingdom of God. 17 And he took the cup, and gave thanks, and said, Take this, and divide it among yourselves: 18 For I say unto you, I will not drink of the fruit of the vine, until the kingdom of God shall come. 19 And he took bread, and gave thanks, and brake it, and gave unto them, saying, This is my body which is given for you: this do in remembrance of me. 20 Likewise also the cup after supper, saying, This cup is the new testament in my blood, which is shed for you.” (Luke 22:15-20)


“For as often as ye eat this bread, and drink this cup, ye do shew the Lord’s death  till he come.” (1Corinthians 11:26)

 

 

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